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Fine Embellishment Everything from hand engraving and scrimshaw to filework and carving. The fine art end of the knifemaker's craft.

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  #1  
Old 01-25-2005, 07:31 AM
Omega Omega is offline
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last try to get an answer

I read a thread on acid etching (but i cant remember by who ) in the post this individual used a special ink to write/draw his design then comes tha acid bath and he is left with a flat background and beautiful raised letters and designs. my question is what keeps the acid from eatting away at the side of the raised portions? im not sure im being totally clear but im just not sure how to explain the question any better


thanks

bill


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Old 01-25-2005, 08:15 AM
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It will eat away at the sides, but just slightly. It's a function of surface area, and since the etch is a few thousandths deep, there's just not that much surface area for the acid to eat.


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Old 01-25-2005, 08:18 AM
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Jeremy Krammes Jeremy Krammes is offline
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I'm pretty sure that Montejano posted that threat, but I can't seem to find it.

The last page of this thread talks about it. http://www.knifenetwork.com/forum/sh...ad.php?t=25368


Jeremy


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Old 01-25-2005, 08:44 AM
Ray Cover Jr Ray Cover Jr is offline
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Omega,

The ink you are looking for is made by New England Graphics. It is a black acid resitant ink made for etching newspaper printing plates. It is really good stuff. I don't have their address. It has been so long since I have done acid etching that I have lost all those contacts. I remember that New England Graphics is the name of the company. Maybe a Google search will help you find them.

The acid will eat at the sides unless you carefully resist those between acid baths. That is why acid etshing always has a slightly ragged edge compared to a cut line.

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Old 01-25-2005, 08:58 AM
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Some acids have the tendency to eat straight down. For an etch to show clearly it does not have to be very deep. With your eyes closed you can barley feel it is raised. the color of the backround gives the illusion of depth. Like the pattern in damaskus.


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Old 01-25-2005, 09:28 AM
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the acid does eat at the sidewalls and undercuts the masked off areas to some degree. if you want to do a deep etch , the proper order of events is to etch, neutralize the metal and dry, reapply the resist to the etched walls and then put it back into the acid. this process is repeated until the proper depth is reached .
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Old 01-25-2005, 04:20 PM
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thanks for the help guys


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Old 01-25-2005, 04:25 PM
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in that post he places the knife in vetically and in others ive seen them put flat on their side. is one better than the other


thx bill


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Old 01-25-2005, 05:02 PM
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yes
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Old 01-27-2005, 06:34 PM
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ok which one also how do you know when to take the blade out? also if im etching 440c what %nitric do i use


bill


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Last edited by Omega; 01-27-2005 at 07:48 PM.
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Old 01-29-2005, 09:25 AM
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im just guessing but i suppose you dont use nitric acid straight?


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Old 01-29-2005, 10:03 AM
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you don't use nitric at all until you have practiced with copper sulfate or another fairly safe etchant first. nitric acid does come in several strengths an antonio probably isn't using more than a 25% solution. nitric acid is also on the terrorist alert list and is not as easily availible as it was a few years ago.
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Old 01-29-2005, 05:33 PM
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Friend Omega

I have read their question and although I don't understand their questions completely, I will try to respond him.

The antacid inks are usually sold in specialized stores of fine arts (they are usually of asphalt or similar) he/she asks for the inks and if he/she didn't find them tells it to me and I will tell him as preparing an ink at home.

The acid when it attacks to the metal, he/she makes it in all the addresses (vertical and horizontal) but in a bigger surface, it attacks with more force and the acid warms. The borders of the ink are also attacked, but with smaller aggressiveness that the bottom of the steel. The attack to the borders is the delicate of the " etching " pu?s it should use a very good ink that it tolerated the acid. The acid will go eating the border, but if the line of the antacid ink is of an acceptable grosor (normal) it will support the attack during enough time and it will leave a beautiful engraving. there are diverse types of acids, mordant Dutch, ferric, nitric chloride, etc...
I personally use the nitric acid (40% to 45% of purity) but then it is diluted with water to reduce their attack force, it also depends from the metal to record.
The steel 440C, it is recorded of marvel and with a fantastic relief. there are people that think that to the stainless one alone a small relief can be given and that idea is not certain; with an appropriate technique to the steel a relief can be given of up to 5 or tenth 6 of millimeter, in a single attack of the acid.
The metal to be recorded can place in any position to be attacked, but the acid will work in a different way. In vertical it is a good attack position, because the remains of the decomposition of the metal, come off to the bottom of the recipient ;
If we work in horizontal the remains of the recorded metal, they accumulate in the bottom of the metal and it is necessary to go cleaning the surface of their remains, in a periodic way.
In vertical debit side of recording with certain slowness, because if the acid this very strong one, is formed an upward trail of bubbles and it affects to the uniform attack of the acid, creating irregularities in the bottom of the engraving.

I wait to have responded bi?n to their consultation and to contribute something from light to their doubts.
The translation will be a problem, but I send it to him in Spanish and they will be possible it to translate better.

A greeting of Montejano.

-------------------------------------------

Amigo Omega

He leido su pregunta y aunque no entiendo completamente sus preguntas , le intentar? responder .

Las tintas anti?cidas se suelen vender en tiendas especializadas de bellas artes ( suelen ser de asfalto o similares ) pregunte por las tintas y si no las encontrara d?gamelo y le dir? como preparar una tinta en casa .

El ?cido cuando ataca al metal , lo hace en todas las direcciones ( vertical y horizontal ) pero en una superficie mayor, ataca con m?s fuerza y el ?cido se calienta . Los bordes de la tinta tambi?n son atacados , pero con menor agresividad que el fondo del acero .El ataque a los bordes es lo delicado del " aguafuerte " pu?s debe de utilizarse una muy buena tinta que aguante el ?cido . El ?cido ir? comiendo el borde , pero si el trazo de la tinta anti?cida es de un grosor aceptable ( normal ) soportar? el ataque durante bastante tiempo y saldr? un grabado precioso .Hay diversos tipos de ?cidos , mordiente Holandes , cloruro f?rrico , n?trico , etc ...
Yo personalmente utilizo el ?cido n?trico ( 40% a 45% de pureza ) pero luego se diluye con agua para rebajar su fuerza de ataque , depende tambi?n del metal a grabar.
El acero 440C , se graba de maravilla y con un relieve fant?stico .Hay personas que piensan, que al inoxidable solo se le puede dar un peque?o relieve y esa idea no es cierta ; con una t?cnica adecuada al acero se le puede dar un relieve de hasta 5 ? 6 d?cimas de milimetro , en un solo ataque del ?cido .
El metal a grabar se puede colocar en cualquier posici?n para ser atacado , pero trabajar? de distinta manera el ?cido .En vertical es una buena posici?n de ataque , porque los restos de la descomposici?n del metal , se desprenden al fondo del recipiente ;
Si trabajamos en horizontal los restos del metal grabado, se acumulan en el fondo del metal y es preciso ir limpiando la superficie de sus restos , de forma peri?dica .
En vertical debe de grabar con cierta lentitud ,porque si el ?cido esta muy fuerte , se forma una estela ascendente de burbujas y afecta al ataque uniforme del ?cido , creando irregularidades en el fondo del grabado .

Espero haber respondido bi?n a su consulta y aportar algo de luz a sus dudas .
La traducci?n ser? un problema , pero se lo env?o en espa?ol y se lo podr?n traducir mejor .

Un saludo de Montejano .
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  #14  
Old 02-20-2017, 07:43 PM
Blackspadeaxes Blackspadeaxes is offline
 
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Montejano. Hi I'm interested in knowing how to make the antacid ink your talking of. I'm in Australia and have tried to find a supplier but have had no luck.

I've been etching a mild steel test piece with hydrochloric acid with limit suscess any tips for types of acid and ratios would also be appricated.

Thank you blackspade axes.
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Old 02-20-2017, 08:05 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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Blackspadeaxes this thread is 12 years old. You might want to start a new thread explaining what you do now and where you would like to go. Also let folks know you're in Australia in case they don't notice your location. I'm a novice on acid etching if even enough to be called novice. I know about some stuff like etching damascus, not much else. A new thread may be appropriate as some of these guys are probably gone now.
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