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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 02-05-2007, 10:51 AM
PecosMarshal PecosMarshal is offline
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Drilling Tempered Steel

Can somebody tell me what kind of drill bit I can use to drill through 8A stainless that has been heat treated? I appreciate the help!
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  #2  
Old 02-05-2007, 11:03 AM
logem logem is offline
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A carbide spade bit turned at high speed.

Several knife supply houses sell them. Also can be bought a MSC (www.mscdirect.com).

Mike L.
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  #3  
Old 02-05-2007, 11:31 AM
PecosMarshal PecosMarshal is offline
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Thank you very much!
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Old 02-05-2007, 11:36 AM
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I use straight flute solide carbide bits.They work well.


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  #5  
Old 02-05-2007, 11:37 AM
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It would be recommended to have a drill press for this. Carbide bits are very brittle (but very hard). If you don't keep the alignment of your bit straight throughout the process of drilling your hole, you may end up with a broken bit.

Besides the fact that carbide bits are expensive, if broken pieces of the bit gets wedged into the hole that you are drilling, you may not be able to get the lodged piece out of your tang.

Drilling with carbide should be done without cooling fluids. You are basically drilling the hole with friction, thus the need for high rpm.

Good luck.

M.L.
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  #6  
Old 02-05-2007, 11:48 AM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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The spade drills work well but they are not available in all sizes and they are limited as to how thick a piece of steel they can drill through relative to the diameter of the drill.

The straight flute drills, marketed under the brand name of Hi-Roc (among others), come in just about any size and will drill through any thickness of material they are long enough to reach through. As stated above, they are relatively expensive but they are worth every penny when you really need one. They are available from MSC, Enco, McMaster-Carr etc.

You will need to use them in a drill press as mentioned earlier but I have never believed the conventional wisdom on their use that says to use them at high speed with no lubrication. I have done that and it works fine but I normally use slow speed and lubrication and find that works fine as well. If I do break one (very rare) I'd rather do it at a slow speed ...


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Old 02-05-2007, 12:22 PM
wineland wineland is offline
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If you do not need to be real precise you can use a masonary bit. I always use one of these because they are cheap and I can buy them at the local hardware stores.

Richard


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  #8  
Old 02-05-2007, 02:58 PM
PecosMarshal PecosMarshal is offline
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Thanks for all the replies! You guys are fast! Good advise too.
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Old 02-05-2007, 03:27 PM
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It was explained to me years ago, that the reason why you should never use lube with carbide drills is that if the lube should give out for even a moment there's a good chance the drill could grab, even slightly, and the carbide will shatter.


Dennis Greenbaum


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Old 02-05-2007, 07:18 PM
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When I use a straight flute bit, I choke up the bit in the chuck leaving enough of the bit to penetrate the work and use a moderate speed with cutting oil. When using a masonry bit, I sharpen it using a new fine sanding belt then spin it again at a moderate speed with cutting oil.


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Old 02-06-2007, 07:54 AM
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Is 1760 rpm considered to fast for drilling with these ?


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  #12  
Old 02-06-2007, 08:34 AM
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It would be for me, I like 250 rpm....


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